Feb 08, 2023  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course Numbers

In fall 2004, West Texas A&M University changed from a three-digit numbering scheme to a four-digit numbering system, known as the Texas Common Course Numbering System (TCCNS). The four-digit numbers are identified as:

  • First digit identifies the level (1 = freshman, 2 = sophomore, 3 = junior, 4 = senior, 5 = stacked undergraduate/masters, 6 = masters, 7 = masters/doctoral, 8 = doctoral);
  • Second digit identifies the credit-hour value; and
  • Third and fourth digits establish the course sequence or type of course.

0001–0999—developmental courses, do not count toward degree.

1000–2999—primarily freshman and sophomore courses.

3000–4999—open to students who have completed at least 30 hours and any prerequisite.

5000–5999—graduate level stacked with undergraduate.

6000–6999—master’s level.

7000–7999—master’s/doctoral level.

8000–8999—doctoral students only.

NOTE: Students who have taken undergraduate “stacked” courses at WTAMU that have a graduate component cannot take the graduate course if they have already received credit for the corresponding undergraduate course.

Course Prefix

The course prefix indicates the assigned WTAMU course abbreviation and course number; e.g., ACCT 2301.

Course Abbreviation and Number in Brackets

A course abbreviation (prefix) and number in brackets indicates the corresponding common course number, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, if the common course number and/or prefix is different from the WTAMU number; e.g., [GOVT 1310].

Field-of-Study Curriculum (FOSC)

Field-of-study curriculum is a set of courses that satisfy lower-division requirements for a bachelor’s degree in a specific academic area. All public four-year institutions of higher education are required to accept Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board-approved field-of-study courses. Field-of-study curriculum is indicated with the abbreviation “FOSC” within the brackets indicating the common course number of a course; e.g., [MUSI 1181, 1182; FOSC].

Numbers

The numbers indicate semester credit hours, lecture clock hours per week and lab clock hours per week; e.g., 3 3 0 indicates three semester credit hours, three clock hours of lecture per week and zero clock hours of lab per week.

(HAZ)

Courses marked with (HAZ) may require the use of hazardous chemicals and/or equipment. To participate in these classes, an online “Student Laboratory Safety Training” is required and assigned through WTClass upon registration for the class. By registering for the class, the student agrees to 

  • Complete the assigned training by no later than 12th class day for fall/spring terms or 5th class day for summer terms; and
  • Acknowledge non-participation in activities if not completed by 18th class day for fall/spring terms; 10th class day for summer terms.

 

 

Engineering Technology

  
  •  

    ET 4398 - Industrial Internship


    3 0 0
    Supervised industrial work experience related to student’s educational objectives. Fall, spring, summer I, summer II.

English

(Offered through the Department of English, Philosophy and Modern Languages.)

  
  •  

    ENGL 0302 - Introduction to Critical Reading and Writing


    1,3 1,3 0
    Introduction to critical reading and writing as interdependent practices. Prepares students for academic writing by reading closely, analyzing texts and developing and revising a range of compositions. Fulfills TSI requirements for reading and/or writing. May not fulfill baccalaureate degree requirements. Course fee $10; ESLI course fee $100. Fall, spring.
  
  •  

    ENGL 1301 - Introduction to Academic Writing and Argumentation


    3 3 0
    Introduction to academic writing, rhetoric, rhetorical grammar, critical reading, plagiarism, academic integrity and the writing process. Fall, spring, summer.
  
  •  

    ENGL 1302 - Research and Rhetoric


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 . Course builds on topics introduced in WTAMU’s ENGL 1301 —fundamentals of rhetoric, rhetorical grammar, plagiarism and academic integrity—and explores claim types, the research process and documentation. Fall, spring, summer.
  
  •  

    ENGL 2074 - Individual Study


    1-3 0 0
    Individual study designed to meet needs and interests of the student.
  
  •  

    ENGL 2311 - Introduction to Professional and Technical Communication


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 . Introduction to rhetorical techniques associated with workplace correspondence. Students prepare materials in the general areas of correspondence, short reports, instructions and descriptions. Summer, fall.
  
  •  

    ENGL 2321 - British Literature


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1302  or ENGL 2311 . Selected significant works of British literature arranged around a common theme.
  
  •  

    ENGL 2326 - American Literature


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1302  or ENGL 2311 . Selected significant works of American literature arranged around a common theme(s), period or culture.
  
  •  

    ENGL 2331 - World Literature


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1302  or ENGL 2311 . Selected significant works of world literature arranged around a common theme.
  
  •  

    ENGL 2341 - Introduction to Literature


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1302  or ENGL 2311 . Reading and discussion of representative works from major genres with the aim of providing competence in critical reading and analysis, knowledge of formal characteristics and appreciation of literary texts.
  
  •  

    ENGL 2342 - Introduction to Film and Media Studies


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 , ENGL 1302 . Concepts, theories, and methods of film and media through analysis of image and sound, aesthetics, historical concepts, genres, authorship, and issues of class, gender, race and ethnicity, with emphasis on writing, analysis, and research on film and media. Focus on mainstream cinema, documentary and contemporary television.
  
  •  

    ENGL 2343 - Literature and Ideas


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1302  or ENGL 2311 . Interdisciplinary course designed to show how literature and other fields of knowledge interact.
  
  •  

    ENGL 2372 - Style and Information Design


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1301  and ENGL 1302  or ENGL 1301  and ENGL 2311  or equivalent; demonstrated computer competency. Introduction to style and design of technical, professional and scientific documents. Course will address questions of audience, the writing process, sentence-level issues, collaboration and style guides used throughout the disciplines. Spring.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3094 - Individual Study


    1-3 0 0
    Individual study designed to meet needs and interests of the student.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3301 - Creative Writing: Fiction


    3 3 0
    Workshop in the art of writing fiction; topic may vary. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3302 - Creative Writing: Nonfiction


    3 3 0
    Workshop in the art of writing nonfiction. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3304 - Advanced Professional Documentation


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1301  and either ENGL 1302  or ENGL 2311 . Explores in detail the documents produced by technical writers on a regular basis, including standard operating procedures, proposals, requests for work, requirements documents, security plans, contingency plans, memoranda of understanding, etc. Major assignments include a recommendation report, a proposal and a disaster recover plan. Spring.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3305 - Technical Style and Editing


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1301  and either ENGL 1302  or ENGL 2311 . Investigation of the varieties, characteristics, and function of prose style in technical and professional materials such as manuals, annual reports, and technical articles and reports. Students will gain experience clarifying, reducing, expanding and synthesizing technical materials. Consideration will be given to audience adaptation, invention, organization and mechanics explored. Fall, spring.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3306 - Creative Writing: Poetry


    3 3 0
    Workshop in the art of writing poetry. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3307 - Visual Language and Document Design


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite:   and either   or  . Provides an advanced look at the theory and practice of document design, visual rhetoric and document design. Major assignments will include the production of designs for a number of document types such as fliers, proposals, announcements, resumes and business reports.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3307 - Visual Language and Document Design


    3 3 0
    Provides an advanced look at the theory and practice of document design, visual rhetoric and document design. Major assignments will include the production of designs for a number of document types such as fliers, proposals, announcements, resumes and business reports.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3310 - Semantics


    3 3 0
    Derivations and growth of language. Fall.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3311 - Introduction to Language Structure


    3 3 0
    Using advances made in linguistics, explores how English makes meaning through use of semantics, syntax, morphology and phonology. Emphasis on literary language as it affects children ages 6 to 18. Spring, summer.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3312 - History of the English Language


    3 3 0
    Growth and development of the English language from Anglo-Saxon to modern English. Fall.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3341 - Studies in Drama


    3 3 0
    Related works examining major lines of development; topics will vary. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3342 - Film Studies


    3 3 0
    Introduction to and development of the art of analyzing film. Analysis of the challenges and difficulties of turning literary works into film. Comparison of analyzing novels and films. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3350 - The Bible as Literature


    3 3 0
    Literary nature of the Bible and of its influence on Western writing. Every second or third spring.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3351 - Survey of English Literature to 1700


    3 3 0
    Survey of English literature from its origin through the Restoration.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3352 - Survey of English Literature Since 1700


    3 3 0
    Survey of English literature from the Neoclassical period to the present. Spring.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3360 - Survey of American Literature to 1865


    3 3 0
    American literature from its beginnings through Whitman. Spring.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3361 - Survey of American Literature after 1865


    3 3 0
    American literature from the advent of realism to the present. Fall.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3380 - Introduction to Literary Analysis


    3 3 0
    Introduction to fundamentals of literary analysis, critical vocabulary and close reading of a wide range of literature across a variety of periods and genres.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3381 - Literature for Children and Young Adults


    3 3 0
    General survey of literature which is suitable for children and/or young adults, sources of children’s and young-adult literature, standards for selection and evaluation of children’s and young-adult literature. Fall, spring.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3382 - Introduction to Comparative Literature


    3 3 0
    Introduction to the discipline of comparative literature. Students will read a combination of international and interdisciplinary literary texts, as well as some critical theory.
  
  •  

    ENGL 3383 - Masterpieces of World Literature


    3 3 0
    Introduction to significant international literatures and their contexts. Topics may include postcolonial literatures, world literatures in translation, surveys of non-Anglo national literatures, world literatures as resistance.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4301 - Advanced Composition


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite:   and either   or  . Traditional and recent theories of composition with emphasis on practical and pedagogical techniques of improving expository writing. May be repeated once for credit when topics vary. Fall.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4304 - Web Development and Design for Technical Communicators


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1301  and either ENGL 1302  or ENGL 2311 . Introduction to the ways that websites convey information and the process by which they are developed. Students plan, design and implement a website focused upon a specific target audience. No prior experience in building webpages will be required. Fall.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4305 - Advanced Topics in Technical Communications


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1301  and either ENGL 1302  or ENGL 2311 . Exploration of a number of advanced issues related to technical communication and scientific discourse, including topics such as management of the document development process, professional ethics and specialized document forms; the role that professional and technical communicators play in the workplace, and such issues as career development, professional societies and time-management resources. May be repeated once for credit when topics vary. Spring.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4310 - Advanced Grammar


    3 3 0
    Review of traditional grammar; introduction to modern grammar. Spring.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4311 - Language Acquisition


    3 3 0
    How users of English make meaning through language. Emphasizes phonology, morphology, semantics and syntax. Fall.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4321 - British Romanticism


    3 3 0
    Survey of Romantic Movement in Britain. Emphasis on Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Shelley, Keats and Byron.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4322 - Victorian Poetry


    3 3 0
    Intellectual background and major poets of the Victorian age in Britain.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4323 - Modern Literature


    3 3 0
    A study of Modernism and/or contemporaneous movements that focus on British and American writings from 1900–1945.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4332 - 19th-Century Novel


    3 3 0
    Development of the English and/or American novel in the 19th century. Every second or third fall.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4350 - Medieval Literature


    3 3 0
    Early English literature through the 15th century with emphasis on the age of Chaucer. Every second or third spring.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4351 - Works of Geoffrey Chaucer


    3 3 0
    Works of Geoffrey Chaucer. May include emphasis on The Canterbury Tales. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4352 - Works of William Shakespeare


    3 3 0
    Works of William Shakespeare with an emphasis on drama. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4353 - Renaissance Literature


    3 3 0
    Literature written in England, 1500–1660. Topics may include drama exclusive of Shakespeare with an emphasis on dramatists such as Marlowe, Jonson, Webster and Middleton; prose writings of More, Sidney, Bacon, Donne and Bunyan; and/or poetry by Wyatt, Spenser, Shakespeare, Jonson, Herbert, Donne, Marvell and Milton. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4354 - Contemporary Literature


    3 3 0
    A focus on contemporary literature(s) written since 1945. Emphasis may be on American, British or world literatures. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4360 - American Regionalism


    3 3 0
    American literature from the late 19th through the mid-20th century in a variety of genres to include local color writing as well as the broader cultural and intellectual movements within regionalism as geographically defined.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4361 - Multicultural American Literature


    3 3 0
    Focused, comparative study of multicultural U.S. literatures.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4362 - Early American Literature


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: six hours of English. Literature written in English between 1620 and 1800 which illuminates the complexity of American culture and surveys key incidents, writers, and concepts of European invasion of the Americas through the development of literary and cultural legacies of nation building and rationalizations of slavery and cultural domination. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4363 - Literature of the Southwest


    3 3 0
    Introduction to works distinctively Southwestern in tone and subject with emphasis on 20th-century essays, short stories and novels.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4364 - 17th-Century Literature


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: six hours of English. Examination of literature written in Britain during the 17th century. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4365 - 18th-Century Literature


    3 3 0
    Introduction to literature written during the 18th century. May focus on American, British and/or world literatures. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4380 - Literary Theory


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ENGL 3380 . Introduction to the major principles of contemporary literary theory and criticism. Spring.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4392 - Special Topics in Literature


    3 3 0
    Concentrated study of selected genres, periods or authors. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 4393 - Honors


    3 0 0
    Prerequisite: senior standing and approval of department head. Completion of a senior thesis or research project by a candidate for graduation with special honors in the department. Course must be taken in addition to the 123-hour minimum degree requirement.

Environmental Engineering

EVEG

  
  •  

    ENGL 3398 - Internship in English


    3 0 0
    Prerequisite: Twelve hours of English credit; approval of Department Head or Undergraduate Coordinator of English. Provides faculty-directed practical experience in a working environment outside of West Texas A&M University. May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    EVEG 3311 - Hydrology and Hydraulics


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite:  , and   or  . The hydrologic cycle: precipitation, infiltration, runoff, evapotranspiration, groundwater, and stream flow. Hydrograph analysis, flood routing, frequency analysis and urban hydrology. Hydraulics including pipe and channel flow with design applications in culverts, pumping, water distribution, storm and sanitary sewer systems. Spring
  
  •  

    EVEG 3342 - Principles of Water and Wastewater Treatment


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite:  . Physical, chemical and biological processes for the treatment of water and wastewater including air stripping, congulation and flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, absorption, chemical oxidation/disinfection, fixed film and suspended growth biological processes and sludge management. Spring
  
  •  
    Student Laboratory Safety Training

    EVEG 3343 - Principles of Air Pollution Monitoring and Control (HAZ)


    3 2 2
    Prerequisite:   .  , EVEG 3404 . Application of principles of environmental engineering, solid mechanics, and fluid mechanics to monitoring and control of potential air pollutants including liquids, gases and particulate matter. Required laboratory field trips. Collection and analysis of air quality data. Course Fee $25.
  
  •  
    Student Laboratory Safety Training

    EVEG 3344 - Principles of Solid and Hazardous Waste Management (HAZ)


    3 2 2
    Prerequisite:    . Application of principles of mechanics and environmental engineering to solid and hazardous waste management. Required laboratory field trips. Collection and analysis of data necessary to design solid and waste management systems including disposal and mitigation. Course Fee $25. Spring
  
  •  

    EVEG 3361 - Modeling for Environmental Engineering


    3 2 2
    Prerequisite:   ,   . Concepts of pollutant generation, dispersion and mixing, and control processes. Introduction to groundwater pollution and air pollution modeling. Use of approved reference method models for air and water pollution. Course Fee $50. Fall
  
  •  

    EVEG 3404 - Introduction to Fluid Mechanics for Civil and Environmental Engineers


    4 3 3
    Prerequisite:      . Introduction of properties of fluids, conservation of mass, energy, and momentum with applications to internal and external flows. Laboratory collection and analysis of data from experiments to determine fluid and flow field properties with emphasis on conservation principles. Course Fee $25.
  
  •  
    Student Laboratory Safety Training

    EVEG 4097 - Environmental Engineering Research (HAZ)


    1-6 0 0
    Prerequisite:    . Selected individual research topics in environmental engineering to accommodate more substantial research than can be encountered in normal course work. May be repeated for credit a maximum of six hours. Fall
  
  •  

    EVEG 4098 - Environmental Engineering Internship


    1-6 0 0
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Internships provide a unique opportunity for students to apply engineering knowledge and skills in the workplace. Fall, spring, summer two.
  
  •  

    EVEG 4340 - Environmental Systems Engineering


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite:   ; two from    . Introduction to system dynamics and control theory with application of systems thinking and techniques to environmental engineering problems. Spring
  
  •  

    EVEG 4341 - Groundwater Hydrology and Modeling


    3 3 0
    Introduction to flow through porous media and Darcy’s Law. Application of fluid dynamics principles to groundwater flow. Fall
  
  •  
    Student Laboratory Safety Training

    EVEG 4381 - Environmental Engineering Design I (HAZ)


    3 1 4
    Prerequisite: Senior classification and consent of instructor. Project selected for engineering design team with primary application of air quality, water quality, or solid waste and hazardous material management. Course Fee $50.
  
  •  
    Student Laboratory Safety Training

    EVEG 4382 - Environmental Engineering Design II (HAZ)


    3 1 4
    Prerequisite: Senior classification and consent of instructor. Project selected for engineering design team with primary application of air quality, water quality, or solid waste and hazardous material management, but not the same sub-discipline as for EVEG 4381. Course Fee $50.

Environmental Science

  
  •  

    ENVR 3092 - Special Topics


    1-6 0-6 0-12
    Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Consideration in recent advances in environmental sciences. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours credit. Course fee $15.
  
  •  

    ENVR 4095 - Problems


    1-6 0-6 0-12
    Prerequisite: permission of department head. Independent studies in environmental science not covered by regular courses. Fall, spring, summer I, summer II.
  
  •  

    ENVR 4098 - Internship in Environmental Science


    1-3 0 0
    Prerequisite: 60 hours of core courses. Two to six weeks internship at a plant, business or agency to observe and participate in daily operations, under supervision of cooperating personnel involved in environmental aspects of the place. Fall, spring, summer I, summer II.
  
  •  

    ENVR 4301 - Preparation of Environmental Impact Statements


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: 60 hours of core courses. Preparation, review, evaluation and interpretation of environmental impact statements and environmental documents. Fall of even years.
  
  •  

    ENVR 4302 - Environmental Law


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: adviser’s approval. Fundamental study of legal aspects and responsibilities of businesses, industries and agencies. Spring.
  
  •  

    ENVR 4305 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems


    3 2 2
    The combination of mapping and databases to provide combinations of spatial information and modeling capabilities in a multi-disciplinary format. Introduction of basic concepts and data sources, including global positioning systems and basic output products. Course fee $17. Spring.
  
  •  
    Student Laboratory Safety Training

    ENVR 4306 - Hazardous Waste Site Assessment (HAZ)


    3 2 2
    Course provides the student with OSHA 1910.120 certification to work on hazardous waste sites as well as advanced skills in site assessment, sampling protocols, and the selection and use of safety equipment. Course fee $41. May intersession.
  
  •  

    ENVR 4307 - Environmental Project Management


    3 3 0
    Provides students with project management skills required for certification in the PM discipline. Structured to match a project’s life cycle, this course covers detailed topics of the basic concepts of project management, including initiating projects, planning projects, controlling projects, executing projects and closing projects. Fall of odd years.
  
  •  

    ENVR 4310 - Global Agriculture and the Environment

    Same as AGRI 4310 .
    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: PSES 2411  or BIOL 3418  or consent of instructor. Discussion of agriculture systems and practices in relation to how they affect environmental quality from local to global scales. Fall.
  
  •  

    ENVR 4350 - Computer Applications in Hydrogeology

     .
    3 2 2
    Prerequisite: GEOL 3350 . Solving hydrogeology problems using real data and utilizing commercially available software. Examples of problems include direction and velocity of groundwater flow, contaminant transport, and volume and depletion calculations of confined and unconfined aquifers. Same as  . Course fee $15.
  
  •  

    ENVR 4377 - Toxicology

     .
    3 3 0
    Prerequisite:   and   or  , or equivalent with instructor’s consent. Fundamentals of medical and environmental toxicology. Emphasizes major classes of pharmaceuticals and environmental pollutants, target organ and non-target organ directed toxicity, exposure assessment in occupational and environmental settings, toxicological methods, and current topics. Fall.
  
  •  

    ENVR 4404 - Environmental Sampling and Interpretation


    4 3 2
    Hands-on experience in sampling, data validation and interpretation of air, water, soil and biota parameters using current EPA and state protocols. Planning, chain-of-custody, quality assurance and sampling technique. Course fee $15. Spring.
  
  •  
    Student Laboratory Safety Training

    ENVR 4430 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (HAZ)

    Same as BIOL 4430 .
    4 3 2
    Dendrochronology or tree-ring science; principles and applications to archaeology, environmental studies, ecology and climatology. Same as  . Course fee $21.

Finance

(Offered through the Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance.)

  
  •  

    FIN 1307 - Introduction to Personal Finance


    3 3 0
    Problems related to financing family and individual needs. Topics include budgeting, credit management, consumer and student loans, buying a house, buying a car, banking, saving, insurance and personal taxes. Open to business and non-business majors.
  
  •  

    FIN 2374 - Real Estate Fundamentals and Practices


    3 3 0
    Economic and social impact of real estate, real estate market, titles to property, contracts, deeds and conveyances, mortgages and deeds of trust, leases, liens, home ownership, tax factors in real estate, sources of funds and title closing.
  
  •  

    FIN 3310 - Real Estate Appraisals


    3 3 0
    Various approaches to valuation; market, cost and income; appraisal process, capitalization of income, gross-rent multipliers, replacement-cost method and the market-comparison method.
  
  •  

    FIN 3311 - Real Estate Finance


    3 3 0
    Legal nature of real estate mortgages, kinds of mortgages, second liens, real estate bonds, land contracts, lease-back, savings and loan associations, bank finance, mortgage banking, loan applications, title analysis, financing forms, FHA and conventional loans.
  
  •  

    FIN 3320 - Business Finance


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 , ACCT 2302  or concurrent enrollment, and   or concurrent enrollment. Organization, financing and management of a business organization. Topics covering financial instruments, optimum capitalization mixes, leverage, capital budgeting and cost of capital are developed.
  
  •  

    FIN 3335 - Processes of Risk Management


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: FIN 3320  or consent of instructor. Comprehensive overview of financial, legal and operational aspects of commercial risk management and insurance process as practiced in business and industrial settings.
  
  •  

    FIN 3350 - Personal Financial Planning


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: FIN 3320  or consent of instructor. Strategies and methods of effective financial planning. Cash and credit management procedures; credit bureau reports and identity theft; debt, foreclosure and bankruptcy; risk management; retirement, estate and investment planning techniques.
  
  •  

    FIN 3352 - Sports Finance and Business


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: FIN 3320 . Basic theory in finance and accounting applied to managerial control of sport organizations. Includes forms of ownership, taxation, financial analysis, feasibility studies and economic impact studies.
  
  •  

    FIN 4096 - Supervised Readings in Finance


    1-6 0-6 0
    Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of advanced work in a business major, junior standing, approval of department head. Current problems in finance through reading business periodicals, government publications and books which have had a profound influence in the financial world.
  
  •  

    FIN 4311 - Corporate Governance and Ethics


    3 3 0
    Comprehensive overview of current issues in corporate governance and ethics. Topics include theory of the firm, corporate governance and the role of law, board composition and control, executive compensation, corporate citizenship and accountability, ethical decision making, corporate fraud and international governance.
  
  •  

    FIN 4315 - Contemporary Issues in Tax Planning and Finance


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: ACCT 2302 . Introduction to income-tax law and how that law interfaces with business, investment, personal activities and decisions.
  
  •  

    FIN 4320 - Investments


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: FIN 3320  or consent of instructor. Emphasizing the commitment of funds to various security forms such as common stocks, bonds, warrants, convertible bonds, liquid assets and other securities. Industry analysis also is required.
  
  •  

    FIN 4321 - Portfolio Management


    3 3 0
    Methods of modern portfolio analysis and management. Topics include selection of assets, investment styles, portfolio performance evaluation, efficient markets, diversification, international investing and risk analysis. Students will design and implement investment strategies. May be repeated once for credit with consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    FIN 4323 - International Finance


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: FIN 3320  or consent of instructor. Financial management concepts and practices unique to multi-national firms with cases and lectures on risk analysis, financing methods, long-range planning and other topics. Emphasis on pragmatic handling of topical problems in international finance.
  
  •  

    FIN 4324 - Management of Financial Services


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite: FIN 3320  or consent of instructor. Management of financial intermediaries of both depository and non-depository form. Consideration of institutional objectives; environmental, legal and regulatory constraints; changing trends in the development and provision of financial services to both commercial and individual sectors. Course fee $20.
  
  •  

    FIN 4325 - Financial Analysis with Technology Applications


    3 3 0
    Prerequisite:   or consent of instructor. Technology applications of financial analysis that reinforces students’ understanding of fundamental topics in finance. Sample topics include time value of money, financial statement analysis, stock valuation, bond valuation, portfolio theory, option pricing model, and capital budgeting. Fall.
 

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